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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 2:22 am 
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This months challenge was selected by loup_garouis for winning Challenge 2. The challenge is to paint a model using a Gamut Mask.

A Gamut Mask is detailed on James Gurney's blog here: http://gurneyjourney.blogspot.com.au/se ... gamut+mask

A YURMBY wheel tool has also been linked to assist with this challenge: http://www.livepaintinglessons.com/gamutmask.php

An explanation of the OzPainters Challenges can be found here: viewtopic.php?f=4&t=5369

Pictures of completed models and any description you want to add to them should be added to this thread by 12.01 am 20/10/2015.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 7:00 pm 
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Not sure I'm a fan of this approach as it's a digital artwork tool, not really a fine art one. I'll bow out of this one but I look forward to seeing what the 5th challenge consists of.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 20, 2015 8:59 pm 
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I've already got a mini for it. Only seemed right to have a dinosaur.

@ fieldarchy - I'm not sure how you view it as a digital artwork tool. James Gurney is a traditional oil painter and dedicates quite a few pages in his Color and Light book to explaining and setting examples of the use of a gamut mask. It appears to be a useful tool in setting mood and lighting. I do understand that modern movies have played on the gamut mask a lot, hence a lot of blueish scenes with a orange contrast colour.

The YURMBY wheel is a different way of viewing colour than the typical wheel I believe most of us have learned with. But mixing it up is always fun, just like trying new mediums. Even after you go back to the old favoured methods, the change in thinking or method can bring new insight into your usual routine. Similar to walking away from a mini for a few hours to see it with fresh eyes, to avoid being railroaded.

My hope in this challenge is just to play with a lot of muted and chromatic hues (edit: typed achromatic :? ). And I've adored the work of James Gurney since I was 5. The man responsible for my love of all things scaly. :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 7:38 am 
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It is mainly used in digital 2D artwork. James' s work that you are citing may be painted traditionally but he is using a digital tool to complete a 2D piece.

2D is the important part. Some techniques don't translate to 3D figures.

Essentially what this challege is, is a restricted palette or triadic color scheme.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 11:22 am 
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Gamut masking was first put forward in the fine art world in the book The Enjoyment and Use of Color by Walter Sargent in 1923. It may be used mostly in the digital media world, but it has its roots in fine art.

I agree some techniques don't translate well to 3D figures, NMM certainly has its followers, although I know you are not a fan. It doesn't hurt to try gamut masking out. I don't know of any miniature painter that has come forward to say they use it, but it is an excellent way to choose colours. The whole gamut masking theory is used to set mood and setting. The closest I've got is using it in a way to paint moonlit miniatures. Natures own gamut mask, just the same as Atkinson Grimshaw's famous scenes of London by night, in that certain colours just aren't going to feature.

Working on my mini at the moment I've found that I do a lot of what the gamut mask teaches anyway. I dull down a lot of colours to stop it becoming a fruit salad, but keep a few brighter more saturated colours. Certainly a must in the last challenge. The basic colours are so far are lemon yellow, yellow-green, green, blue-green, blue, blue-violet and because I adore the triadic colour scheme a fairly saturated orange-red, because I cannot see the mini without a contrast. And with a carnivore what better colour than a red.

And yes it can be seen as a restricted palette, the term is certainly used interchangeably. But unless you are using particularity muted colours normally, from what I have seen it would not easily translate as a triadic colour scheme. The triadic scheme allows you to pick any tone or shade of one of the triadic scheme colours (example red). The gamut mask restricts this, blocking out certain tones of the colour, the highest chroma reds could be blocked of and all you have to work with is achromatic greys and muted washy reds more seen in skintones. Of course all of this depends on your choice of gamut mask.

I hope this discussion brings people into trying the gamut mask. It is meant to be a challenge after all. :D

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 1:34 pm 
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So what I understand from the Mask and from looking at Gurney's examples, explanation and palettes, he uses the mask to select a set of main colours in a theme (triadic, complementary, accented triadic, analogous etc.) Then he uses light and dark to create lighting contrast and mix colours outside the Gamut Mask that he has used. Where he says he only uses that masks colour his palette clearly shows mixed colour not in the gamut range depicted in the masked colour wheel. So there is a lot of room to colour use if you take his example and not his explanation.

So to modify this for mini painting where you have ultra tiny spaces for colour, I would use the mask to select a few base main colours and then paint the mini normally with light/dark contrasts on the piece such as the zenethal lighting effect or some OSL etc.

Thats to say that if the mask depicts a mid tone, mid value blue. I am free to go from near white to near black using this base colour as a starting point. As per his palette in the top image of the blog post.

This is a tough and technically challenging art/light theory concept to apply to a miniature and produce top results, I wish all the painters good luck.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 4:43 pm 
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I did not understand any of that. But it sounds awesome.


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 5:45 pm 
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Pretty much.

I was playing with my mini for it today, the girl that is riding my lovely dinosaur has fairly normal coloured skin, only due to the fact that I use a orange-red, like Khador Red with Bastion grey, then highlight with a yellowish green that is fairly light. It works as a flesh tone, but isolated from the skin area likely wouldn't be seen as such.

I've so far found that I've had to mix the colour, as I see it in my gamut mask, then after I have the colour right in saturation, and essentially how much grey I have in it, after that I can finally set its tint or shade from there. It's the only way my brain is managing.

As a challenge it is keeping up with its name. I can't just slide into using favourite mixtures of local colours, I have to analyse where it sits in the wheel. I have to look at the paints and ask where it sits in my gamut, and what I have to add to make it fit.

I'm not sure if I will be able to paint completely to a gamut, it may be that outside colours work into it, dulling a colour down with its complementary colour seems logical and fine. Either way it's a guide, if it still seems to capture the mood and general colours set then I'll still regard it as a success.

Yeah, selecting a few basic colours is a workable model for the gamut mask, you would just have to be careful with the saturation of the colours. My gamut is midrange, not right against the edge, so I need to restrain my colours. And yes the gamut doesn't restrict how light or dark you want the colour to become. It doesn't isolate black or white in the gamut, all it isolates is the saturation and colour. Everything else is fair game.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2015 9:17 pm 
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The issue I see happening is that I'd end up painting a mini with a mainly grey toned or low value, low saturation colour palette. Meaning that there are not light or dark highlights and shadows. So the mini will come out as grey at an arms length. White and black are isolated in the gamut mask as it changes the way light is reflected and therefore the saturation of the colours. So I guess this is where the gamut mask needs to be changed into a more useable less restrictive colour picking tool.

I say good luck to all attempting this one as a gamut mask proper, where you only paint in the colours inside the gamut mask. I always remember that warning that colour is out of gamut in older digital drawing software when I was starting in design... ah, back in the day :)

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 3:47 pm 
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Best way to understand it is to try it.

At least that's what I'm doing. Really I just typed a massive explanation in my WIP thread so I'm typed out.

Yeah I remember than old gamut warning in Photoshop, I'd tried to do my HSC art project all in Photoshop. My pictures always turned out different when printed, much to my annoyance. It was due of course to limitations in printing tech, I've no idea if those limitation are still around, or they just changed the colours available in the program. There are very few paint colours that are at the edge of the YURMBY wheel as it is.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2015 8:35 pm 
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I'm looking forward to this. I have no idea what I'm going to paint, but for me part of the challenge is trying and seeing what happens. All experimentation.

Oh yeah, the CMYK is still around in most standard printers. It changes a bit in bigger machines when they can do specialised colours, but the limited gamut still exists. (Source: Ten years in the support industry for them on Saturday <shudder>).

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 7:28 am 
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Hexachrome printing fixes a lot of the gamut issues. It adds an orange and a limey green to the mix. Those two colours suffer badly in CMYK.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 8:42 am 
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Image

Not quite the one I was looking for but it shows where your standard artist's colours sit on the YURMBY wheel.

I'm mostly using the cool colours which even without greying down sit in my gamut mask. Although it is another story with the reds, oranges and yellows as they have a higher saturation assuming that the far outer ring is full chroma.

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PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2015 12:06 am 
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This is beyond it for me so I'll sit this one out too.

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PostPosted: Sun Oct 18, 2015 11:21 pm 
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Between Moab, pax prep, and some health things stressing me out and taking up time, I haven't been able to get any things done for this. I really want to give it a go in the future though. Has anyone else got anything completed yet?

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